12 months ago
April 20, 2023

5 Phrases That Scream BAD COMPANY CULTURE In A Sales Interview

One of the many things that you should look at when considering an employer is the company culture. More than money, opportunities, or other perks, the culture of a company…

Jace Ermidis Toronto Sales Recruiter
Jace Ermidis

One of the many things that you should look at when considering an employer is the company culture. More than money, opportunities, or other perks, the culture of a company can make or break your experience with the organization.

You can learn about a company’s culture in a number of ways. You can read up on them online, check out reviews, and read the company website. But what is perhaps the most telling is what an interviewer and other employees you speak with have to say during the interview. Our sales recruiters point out certain phrases that can be a sign of bad company culture.

Below is a list of terms our sales recruiters suggest you listen for during your next sales job interview:

1. “We have a sink or swim mentality.”

This phrase suggests that the company has a high-pressure environment where employees are expected to perform or fail independently, without much support or guidance. It can also indicate that teamwork is not an embedded part of the sales culture and you will have to figure things out on your own to have success.

2. “We expect our team to do what it takes.”

This phrase can indicate a culture of overwork and burnout. It suggests that the company values long hours and hard work over work-life balance. You could be expected to work evenings and weekends and you may not receive additional compensation.

How to spot bad company culture

3. “We have a competitive sales culture.”

This phrase suggests that the company prioritizes competition over collaboration and teamwork. It may indicate an environment where employees are pitted against each other, rather than working together to achieve common goals. It can also suggest the company is more focused on closing deals than helping customers achieve their goals and objectives.

4. “We have a high turnover rate.”

If the interviewer mentions that the company has a high turnover rate, it may indicate a toxic culture where employees don’t feel valued or supported. It could also suggest that the company has poor management or a lack of opportunities for growth. If you hear this mentioned, you may want to follow up about why this is happening.

5. “We have a firm dress code and attendance policy.”

While some companies may have specific dress codes and attendance policies, this phrase may indicate a rigid and inflexible culture that doesn’t value individuality or work-life balance. If you hear these phrases, working from home and flexible hours of operation are not commonly offered.

Finding a good sales company culture is important for job seekers. If the interviewer mentions any of these above phrases, it may be a red flag for bad company culture. It’s important to pay attention to not only what is said, but also the tone and body language of the interviewer, and to ask follow-up questions to get a better sense of the company’s culture.

Get More Advice From Our Sales Recruiters

How to Prepare for a Sales Job Interview

What NOT To Talk About In A Sales Job Interview

How Do You Close A Sales Job Interview?

SalesForce Search is a sales recruitment agency that specializes in hiring sales rockstars. Hiring top salespeople is tough. Only 55% meet their quota. Our proactive approach recruits talented salespeople before they hit the market. As North America’s leading sales headhunter we recruit salespeople in every sector of the economy including, software, manufacturing, financial services and medical devices. To find your next sales rockstar, start your search here.

Jace Ermidis Toronto Sales Recruiter

Jace Ermidis

Jace is a sales recruiter with almost a decade of experience building high-performing sales teams in North America, across Europe, Asia, and Australia. He also has plenty of tips to help your sales team increase revenue!

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